Stephen Vincent Benet (1898-1943)

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Stephen Vincent Benet (1898-1943) wrote three collections of poetry, several novels, short stories, screenplays, and radio broadcasts, and a libretto for an opera. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1929 for his long poem “John Brown’s Body,” which depicted important events in the Civil War using both real and fictional perspectives. Benet also received the O. Henry Story Prize, the Roosevelt Medal, and a posthumous Pulitzer Prize in 1944 for “Western Star,” the first part of an epic poem about American history. Benet grew up in a family to which the military and literature were both important aspects of life, so it is no surprise that he spent a year in civilian military service (in the same department as James Thurber), or that his poetry touches on issues of war. His siblings also became writers. *info from http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/618*
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'''Stephen Vincent Benet''' (1898-1943) wrote three collections of poetry, several novels, short stories, screenplays, and radio broadcasts, and a libretto for an opera. He worked with the State Department in Washington, DC in 1918. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1929 for his long poem “John Brown’s Body,” which depicted important events in the Civil War using both real and fictional perspectives. Benet also received the O. Henry Story Prize, the Roosevelt Medal, and a posthumous Pulitzer Prize in 1944 for “Western Star,” the first part of an epic poem about American history. Benet grew up in a family to which the military and literature were both important aspects of life, so it is no surprise that he spent a year in civilian military service (in the same department as James Thurber), or that his poetry touches on issues of war. His siblings also became writers.  
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info from http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/618
  
 
written by Word Works intern Monica Root, September 2013
 
written by Word Works intern Monica Root, September 2013
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back to [[Names of Poets--Living and Deceased]]
 
back to [[Names of Poets--Living and Deceased]]

Latest revision as of 13:44, 17 January 2016

Stephen Vincent Benet (1898-1943) wrote three collections of poetry, several novels, short stories, screenplays, and radio broadcasts, and a libretto for an opera. He worked with the State Department in Washington, DC in 1918. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1929 for his long poem “John Brown’s Body,” which depicted important events in the Civil War using both real and fictional perspectives. Benet also received the O. Henry Story Prize, the Roosevelt Medal, and a posthumous Pulitzer Prize in 1944 for “Western Star,” the first part of an epic poem about American history. Benet grew up in a family to which the military and literature were both important aspects of life, so it is no surprise that he spent a year in civilian military service (in the same department as James Thurber), or that his poetry touches on issues of war. His siblings also became writers.

info from http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/618

written by Word Works intern Monica Root, September 2013


back to Names of Poets--Living and Deceased

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